Palatine’s thoughts on the total eclipse

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Palatine’s thoughts on the total eclipse

Palatine High school teacher Sean Fisher-Rohde and Hoffman Estates science teacher Tyler Michie demonstate the saftey of wearing the glasses for the solar eclipse event.

Palatine High school teacher Sean Fisher-Rohde and Hoffman Estates science teacher Tyler Michie demonstate the saftey of wearing the glasses for the solar eclipse event.

screenshot "D211 Eclipse Viewing Safety" Sean Fisher-Rhode YouTube channel

Palatine High school teacher Sean Fisher-Rohde and Hoffman Estates science teacher Tyler Michie demonstate the saftey of wearing the glasses for the solar eclipse event.

screenshot "D211 Eclipse Viewing Safety" Sean Fisher-Rhode YouTube channel

screenshot "D211 Eclipse Viewing Safety" Sean Fisher-Rhode YouTube channel

Palatine High school teacher Sean Fisher-Rohde and Hoffman Estates science teacher Tyler Michie demonstate the saftey of wearing the glasses for the solar eclipse event.

Meghan Fortunato, Reporter

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Palatine High School is celebrating the solar eclipse event and many students around the halls of Palatine have been sharing their opinion about the event on Monday. Some may have just learned about the solar eclipse but talking to various students around Palatine they seem intrigued to learn more about it. Fellow students in the halls of Palatine are excited to watch the event occur on Monday.

“It is an amazing event and we will definitely be outside watching, I’m disappointed that we won’t be able to see the totality from Palatine but it will still be an experience to remember,” student Megan Dowd commented.

People have booked hotels and made a big deal out of it. Living in the heartland, Palatine can receive almost full coverage when walking outside the school, wait for the eclipse, get your mind blown and then walk back inside. No one has to set up 400 tents and plan for weeks; students can experience it at Palatine and have an extraordinary experience just by walking out the school doors.

“It’s so rare and I want to try to see the full coverage next time but we are lucky because we are able to see 89% anyways,” replied another students of Palatine Clare Kean.

The care towards the eclipse is a big deal to many people of Palatine High School. We’re just some humble species wandering around on the outskirts of a regular galaxy. We can understand it all, and that is wonderful and amazing. speaking to not only students but teachers around the school.

“It is going to be something else, I can’t wait to experience it and bring my students out to watch as well, hopefully the rain won’t stand in the way,” social studies department Bill Lepage stated.

“There is a great learning experience from the eclipse and would never let my students miss this opportunity to watch” consumer science department teachers Emily Pilguy and Miriam Castro. Both agreed with one another while remembering a solar eclipse event while Castro was in third grade and Pilguy was two.

Eclipses are not rare, there’s two eclipses every two years. But what’s rare is to have it sweep over the world’s third most populous country, which is what it’s going to do on August 21. Talking to different teaching departments it was shown not just science teachers are intrigued but the whole school is getting involved in the solar eclipse.

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